Category Archives: MMOG

Pre-Teens Get Immersive

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Sramana Mitra has penned an insightful post on the pre-teen market: what their activities are online, which sites they find popular etc. You can read it here, or view Read/WriteWeb’s take on it here.

Given that pre-teens are Yoick’s sweetspot, we particularly like these excerpts from Sramana’s report:

Websites targeted at pre-teens earn majority of their revenue from subscription, e-commerce and content provided by the websites. Other sources of revenue for these websites are advertisements placed either on their websites or in the games, downloading of music and games, licensing of content, syndication and partnerships for developing content and gaming…

and this:

Immersive gaming model used by NeoPets and other gaming websites could well be the business model of tomorrow as it allows advertisers to place creative advertisements in games without disrupting the flow of the game and thus generating interest in the product, which creates brand awareness.

Bit Part: Social Networks as Social Media

Social networking and social destination sites by and for social networking alone just don’t cut it. People get bored with networking  for networking’s sake: there needs to be a focus point or focal points beyond simply socnet.

Om Malik has glommed onto this thought I had way back in the mists of time, circa August 2005 and now asks: Are Social Networks Just a Feature?

In Yoick’s view, successful web communities have at their core, a set of pursuits or strange attractors – these pursuits work best if they deliver some benefit from interactions between members of a community…the higher the usefulness factor, the more compelling an attractor.

To sum up, I agree with Om. Yoick is essentially building an “integrated community entertainment platform”, a term borrowed from Andrew Littlefiled, CEO of Doppelganger. Within this ICEP, the social networking aspects are critical as part of the community journey, but they are not the sole destination.

Virtual Venture Wrap: Doppelganger goes to C

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Doppelganger, a San Francisco-based virtual world company has raised a Series C funding round of $5 million from Greycroft Partners.

CEO, Andrew Littlefield, prefers to call them a community entertainment company that builds virtual environments for the rest of us, aka non hardcore gamers.

Doppelganger initially raised a Series A of $2.5 m from Draper Fisher Jurvetson and a Series B of $8.5 m from Trident Capital, DFJ and Draper Richards. That’s a lot of dough for a virtual world play – but when you consider it costs them up to $250k to build one of their inworld characters you understand where the money is going. Hey guys, ever heard of user-generated content…

Andrew sees the market for 3D environment vendors to be akin to the nascent cable market. He sees Second Life as focusing on the older sci-fi demographic whereas they are angling to be the 3D MTV, with Habbo Hotel the Nickolodeon. Neat analogy.

At Yoick we agree that these interactive spaces will act mostly as a connection manager (the first C in CICS), at least initially, and we also agree that they will reach similar sizes as MySpace.

Virtual Worlds: A $100 billion opportunity

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Venture guy, serial entrepreneur and chairman of Second Life, Mitch Kapor said in an interview at the World Economic Forum in Davos that he sees virtual worlds as being a $100 billion opportunity.

When the PC was invented, nobody anticipated the spreadsheet, which I was very involved with, when the Internet became commercial nobody anticipated Amazon.com or eBay, and I have the same conviction that these virtual worlds are going to have killer applications that will just make it a huge industry.

Right on, Mitch.

Virtual Worlds: Life is not a Game

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It doesn’t take a rocket scientist to note that Second Life is vastly different from World of Warcraft. But Clay Shirky has stated the obvious — the one is a platform with fascinating in-world effects, the other is a multi-player game.

Clay believes that we shouldn’t be comparing the two. With this point I agree. Games are games, they involve quests, levelling, the magic circle metaphor and in some instances, the thing that has given rise to their popularity – guilds (the ability to work as a team). They also include a range of negatives – shards and lag.

Second Life is a 3D persistent environment – it does not per se have games or quests and is more focused on allowing its residents to achieve status through the acquisition of status symbols — land being the primary one, but stuff in general. It is very individualistic, but contains social elements – residents can communicate amongst each other, albeit currently on a rudimentary level, and they can collaborate on building items, again at a rudimentary level.

Similarly to games, Second Life has downsides such as lag and severe limitations on the number of residents that can visit an inworld place at any one time.

In terms of comparitors, Second Life should be compared to other forms of online social media such as MySpace and Cyworld. These social media plays have had massive adoption – why: they pander to our innate desire for CICS (Connect, Interact, Create and Share), they are easy to use, are extremely viral and, in particular in the case of MySpace, have an open architecture – I can visit your MySpace page and watch a YouTube video.

Second Life doesn’t rate as a social media play. Linden Labs may have open sourced the SL viewer, but their product is far from open or viral. It is not intuitive to navigate inworld and creating and sharing are hard things to do. Just as a newb user gets comfortable she starts to experience massive client/server induced lag and SL crashes. Oh well, she sighs, I tried that…now back to social networking.

I agree with Clay that games are not going away any time soon, in fact as a form of pure entertainment…they rock. 3D persistent spaces, however, are categorised in the virtual world arena for now, but should be compared to other forms of social media.

In fact, at Yoick we strongly believe that as social media the right combination will lead to massive Skype-like adoption. Stay tuned for our persistent 3D environment – we are on the cusp of emerging from stealth…

Second Life Goes In Search Of Its Voice

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Second Life sees voice as an important tool for its residents. According to the virtual world’s creator, Linden Labs, their development path is focused onhaving both voice-enabled avatars so you can simply walk up to someone and engage in a conversation and allow for spatially aware multiple voices so that you can walk through an area and hear people speaking with their voices emanating from where they are in that space.

In an interview with IDG News, Joe Miller, Linden Lab’s VP of platform and technology development also noted that they have a significant initiative under way to make inworld search more natural and visual.

Joe also mentioned they have created an API which will allow their business customers to create their own front porches into SL. Not my favorite analogy, but this is an important development. In fact all three initiatives are important as SL has copped a lot of flack for its clunkiness. Marketing and hype is one thing, but happy users is a whole other ball game.

Let’s end with a great quote, which we strongly agree with…We believe that multiple-user virtual environments are just in the beginning stages of their existence…to create communities, commerce and a permanent place for ourselves.

In-game Banks for Persistent World

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According to Associated Press, Sweden-based MindArk is going to release five banking licenses within Entropia Universe, their 3d persistent world.

The licenses will be valid for two years and the holders will be entitled to set up bank buildings on the planet of Calypso. Once set up they will be able to charge interest on loans and advertise on in-game billboards.

Entropia Universe has its own virtual currency, the Project Entropia Dollar, which is fixed to the US dollar at 10:1.

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